Changing base gaskets and timing chains. Walkthrough

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Changing base gaskets and timing chains. Walkthrough

Postby Colonel_Klinck » Fri May 03, 2013 6:24 am

Well my base gaskets have been leaking again. Scrutineering at Snetterton race told me to have it sorted by Oulton round so its cylinders off time again :roll: As she's done 50k miles I thought it would also be a good idea to change the timing chains while its apart. Will try and do a walkthrough of all the steps. Although looking at the pics I took yesterday I think the lens must be covered in oil as they are shite. Will investigate.

Decided to do it at my m8s workshop in the Cotswolds. He has a workbench I can use and also if it all goes tits I can cry his name across the workshop and hope he comes over and gets me out of the shit. That is the plan anyway :wink: Only had 2 hours at it yesterday afternoon before the pub called us but managed to get the bike stripped down and engine tipped forward to get at the rear cylinder. (its pivoted on the engine mount below the swing arm mount) I was going to remove the engine but doing it this way mean I can leave things like the oil lines, clutch and a few wires attached and save myself a bit of time. Thats the hope anyway.

Before

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Half stripped

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Engine pivoted

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Will try and improve the pic quality today and photograph every stage. Wish me luck!
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Re: Timing Chain change time

Postby weeksy » Fri May 03, 2013 6:44 am

Wowsers... that's all got to go back together !!!!

enjoy mate.
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Re: Timing Chain change time

Postby tripoddave » Fri May 03, 2013 10:36 am

That's not going to be easy doing the job with the motor still in the frame.
I've done this job a few times (!) and I didn't even try consider doing it in situ as it were.
If you've not done the job before it's important to know that the pistons have to be on the con rods (and con rods attached) before putting the barrels back on which means that conventional ring compressors don't work.
Also, with the barrels off it might be a good time to replace the original studs with the thicker, later ones if you are running the waisted versions. BTW: buy KTM there are some rubbish ones about that have been over hardened.
Wish you the joy of it - do keep us posted!
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Re: Timing Chain change time

Postby KTM666 » Fri May 03, 2013 11:21 am

tripoddave wrote:That's not going to be easy doing the job with the motor still in the frame.
I've done this job a few times (!) and I didn't even try consider doing it in situ as it were.
If you've not done the job before it's important to know that the pistons have to be on the con rods (and con rods attached) before putting the barrels back on which means that conventional ring compressors don't work.
Also, with the barrels off it might be a good time to replace the original studs with the thicker, later ones if you are running the waisted versions. BTW: buy KTM there are some rubbish ones about that have been over hardened.
Wish you the joy of it - do keep us posted!


x 2 mine has started leaking / misting at the front base gasket ....it seems its mk1 thing.....not heard of mk2 doing it yet.....so new studs for me for what they cost its a no brainer
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Re: Timing Chain change time

Postby Colonel_Klinck » Fri May 03, 2013 5:36 pm

tripoddave wrote:That's not going to be easy doing the job with the motor still in the frame.
I've done this job a few times (!) and I didn't even try consider doing it in situ as it were.
If you've not done the job before it's important to know that the pistons have to be on the con rods (and con rods attached) before putting the barrels back on which means that conventional ring compressors don't work.
Also, with the barrels off it might be a good time to replace the original studs with the thicker, later ones if you are running the waisted versions. BTW: buy KTM there are some rubbish ones about that have been over hardened.
Wish you the joy of it - do keep us posted!



I took the engine out last time and its actually easier left in the frame. You've got something to lever against when trying to undo heavily torqued nuts. You leave the pistons in the barrels. You lift the cylinder up just far enough to expose the piston/conrod joint but not let the piston rings pop out of the cylinder (I cocked this up on the rear cylinder :roll: ) Then remove the clip and slide out the gudgeon pin. Then just lift the cylinder off with the piston still safety inside it. I've done all this before when I got the heads ported and polished. Studs were replaced last time. Its the timing chains that scared me and rightly so! :shock:

Its been an interesting day. A few very worrying moments and some head scratching and then worrying moments again. Full write up and pics to follow later. Dinner now and then off to the pub to for a well earned pint or 2. :D
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Re: Timing Chain change time

Postby JohnJJr » Fri May 03, 2013 5:58 pm

Wow ! the things we go through for the THRILLS

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Re: Timing Chain change time

Postby The Gin Reaper » Fri May 03, 2013 9:17 pm

KTM666 wrote:
tripoddave wrote:That's not going to be easy doing the job with the motor still in the frame.
I've done this job a few times (!) and I didn't even try consider doing it in situ as it were.
If you've not done the job before it's important to know that the pistons have to be on the con rods (and con rods attached) before putting the barrels back on which means that conventional ring compressors don't work.
Also, with the barrels off it might be a good time to replace the original studs with the thicker, later ones if you are running the waisted versions. BTW: buy KTM there are some rubbish ones about that have been over hardened.
Wish you the joy of it - do keep us posted!


x 2 mine has started leaking / misting at the front base gasket ....it seems its mk1 thing.....not heard of mk2 doing it yet.....so new studs for me for what they cost its a no brainer


you have now..... mine does when revved hard on the track..... :cry:
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Re: Timing Chain change time

Postby Colonel_Klinck » Fri May 03, 2013 10:40 pm

Full write up is going to have to wait till its finished I'm afraid. Too knackered to do a half arsed attempt. Took nearly 100 pics today alone! Although some are duplicates, out of focus ect but wanted to show every step. Was a bit of a cockup after fitting rear timing chain and putting that side (clutch side) all back together only to realise when I got the front stripped down that the balancer weight on that end of the balancer shaft is fixed and so i now have to take all the rear side off again to slide the shaft out to replace the front timing chain :roll: Its been a massive learner curve for me. Will hopefully be a comprehensive walkthrough though and no one else will have to suffer the pain and worry when they haven't got a fooking clue what they are doing :lol:
"They lie about marijuana. Tell you pot-smoking makes you unmotivated. Lie! When you're high, you can do everything you normally do, just as well. You just realise that it's not worth the f*cking effort. There is a difference."
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Re: Timing Chain change time

Postby JohnJJr » Fri May 03, 2013 11:39 pm

Colonel_Klinck wrote:Full write up is going to have to wait till its finished I'm afraid. Too knackered to do a half arsed attempt. Took nearly 100 pics today alone! Although some are duplicates, out of focus ect but wanted to show every step. Was a bit of a cockup after fitting rear timing chain and putting that side (clutch side) all back together only to realise when I got the front stripped down that the balancer weight on that end of the balancer shaft is fixed and so i now have to take all the rear side off again to slide the shaft out to replace the front timing chain :roll: Its been a massive learner curve for me. Will hopefully be a comprehensive walkthrough though and no one else will have to suffer the pain and worry when they haven't got a fooking clue what they are doing :lol:



i take it there's no repair manual ?

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Re: Timing Chain change time

Postby Colonel_Klinck » Sat May 04, 2013 5:28 am

not for an individual job like this no. Repair manual only disassemble the engine, services parts and puts the whole engine back together again. There is a walkthrough on ADVrider but its on a old 950 Adv and several parts have been updated since. Its missing quite a few pics as well. It has been useful but not comprehensive enough. Without my buddy there to get me out of the shite a couple of times I would have been stuck. This is what I want to try and avoid with this one. Hopefully I can.
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Re: Timing Chain change time

Postby Colonel_Klinck » Mon May 06, 2013 12:19 pm

Ok here is the walkthrough. Going to make it into a PDF. If anyone can think of a step I've missed let me know and I'll add it. Missing a couple of pics which I will source.



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I’m going to try and walk through base and head gasket change with timing chains replacement on the 990 LC8 engine. Mine is in a Superduke 06 with 50220 fairly hard miles on the clock. Mods are heads ported and polished at 42k miles, Motobox and full titanium Akra system.

Reason for doing this is the basegaskets are leaking (again) so I’m going to use some Wellseal this time after cleaning everything up and over torque the heads down to 44nm instead of 38. If they leak again she’s in the bin! While in there it was recommended to change the timing chains. Not something I’ve ever attempted before on any engine so pretty scary for me. I am using a walkthrough from http://www.ktm.950info called Camchain R&R http://ktm950.info/how/Orange%20Garage/ ... chain.html but it’s on a 950 and some parts have changed since then. Also not as in depth that a noob like me could use it on my own. I did the work at a m8s workshop. He owns a 950 Adv and has changed his timing chains so knows the engine and can help me out when I venture into the unknown. Also has a bike bench and a few tools I don’t own yet that will be required.

Here she is looking a bit sorry for herself. Oil leaking for both base gaskets and recently been raced so covered in it. Crap everywhere. Hopefully looking better soon.

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Get everything off the bike . Disconnected the oil tank by removing pipe below the feed valve so didn’t lose any oil out of the tank. It’s only 2 trackdays and a 1.5 hour race old so a bit more in it yet.


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Plan orignally was to take the engine out and work on the bench but decided to leave the engine in the frame and pivot it forward at the lowest engine bolt. Having it in the frame give me something to lever against with some of the larger torqued nuts.


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All the bits required to do the job.

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Head and base gaskets

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Gudgeon pin retaining clips

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Timing chains

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So into it. Remove the speak plugs so you can turn the engine over by hand. You do this by removing the plug in the centre of the ignition casing and using a large hex/ allen socket and tuning anticlockwise. We want to get TDC for front cylinder first and remove the cams. It’s the rear cylinder coming off first and rear timing chain being removed first but you need the front cams out to be able to remove the rear timing chain. I’ll expain why when I get to that point. I only know this as I didn’t remove the cams and ran into this problem. Ended up having to remove the front cam bridge when the piston was not at TDC. Valves were partially open so there was pressure on the bridge from cams. Took 10 mins are undoing bolts half a turn each cross ways across the bridge to avoid breaking it. You don’t want to break the cam bridge! It’s machined and matched at manufacture with the head. Breaking it will prove very expensive!

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Front cylinder at TDC. Dots lined up and lobes facing outwards. Remove the bridge and the cams. I’m missing this pic as I didn’t remove them at this point.

(pic required!!!)

Remove the rear cam cover and keep turning the engine anticlockwise until the 2 dots line up to show the rear at TDC. Lobes face in and lock the engine with the engine locking bolt inserted in clutch side. You might want to check valve clearances at this point. I did mine a month ago so didn’t do them again.

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Engine locking bolt

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Remove the cam bridge and lift out the cams. Now remove the cam chain tensioner. Remove the plug and then I use a magnet to slide the actual tensioner out. If it comes out in 2 bits its fooked and will have to be replaced. Mine were replaced 8k miles ago and are thankfully fine.

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Next remove the double timing gear needle bearing bolt.

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With a hooked piece of wire or similar lift the timing chain over the double gear and it will sit on a small shelf on the inside and remove the gear.

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Now you have access to the 2 internal cylinder bolts. Remove the nuts. Be careful as you really down’t want to drop one of these down the timing chain channel and into the guts of the engine. Everything has a coating of oil and so is slippy. I use a magnet again. There is also a washer under the nut so don’t forget about that. It may come out with nut or you can remove it once you have the cylinder off the bike. Also remove the 2 external nuts.

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Now remove the chain guide. 8mm bolt and the outide and lift the guide out through the top.

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At this point I put the cams back in and secured with a 4 bolts into the bridge. This is to stop the shim buckets falling out later. I’m not having the valves out so no need to remove the buckets. One less thing to have to put back and mixing up th ebuckets and shims is exactly the kind of thing I’d do.


The cylinder can be lifted up. A wobble from side to side breaks the gasket seal and gently lift the cylinder until the top of the con rod becomes visable. You want to leave the piston in the cylinder for now. If you want to inspect and measure ring gaps you can do this later. You will see the gudgeon pin come into view. You remove it from the opposite side to the timing chain. You can see the rings so don’t go any further or they will pop out. I fill the open engine with clean rags so you can’t drop anything in there. The clip holding the gudgeon pin in will love nothing more than to fly out as you remove it and drop into the guts of the engine. This could be bad. With the clip removed you can just ease the pin out by using your finger from the oppostite side. With the pin out the cylinder will just lift off.

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You can see here the marks in the engine casings that is not helping with oil leaks. I’m going to use very fine wet and dry and WD40 to remove as much of these as possible. They aren’t deep and I’m only using very gentle pressure. Remove the cylinder bolts and dowle pins and starter motor to make this easier.

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Nothing now in the way so removing marks in engine casing and cleaning it up.

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Now take the head and and bore apart. They are held together with 3 allen bolts.

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These were cleaned up 8k miles ago when I had heads ported and polished. Some carbon build up. I won’t be removing it as it can only help with compression huh ;) Remove the dowel pins so you can use wet and dry wrapped around a block of wood so as ti get a nice even pressure. Clean off all the crap on the gasket area.

Cleaned up

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I changed the rings 8k miles ago and then quite a lot of cross hatching was visible on the rear cylinder. Its not as visible as before so has been some wear as the rings have bedded in.

8k miles ago
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Now

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Ok that’s all ready to be reassembled later. Now its time to get to the rear timing chain. So off with the clutch side engine casing. You don’t need to remove the cluch cover this will come off with the casing. There is a bolt hiding inside water pump though so remove this cover to gain access to bolt.
You might want to do a water pump service at this point. Mine was done 35k miles ago so I bought the kit. As it turns out the shaft was fine so I just changed the bears and seal.

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Now for me this is where it gets scary.

Timing Chain change

Ok so to get to the timing chain for the rear cylinder the gears and balancer weight has to come off. Impact gun comes in very handy here as this is torqued to 130mn.

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washers come off, so go back on in this order

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As you can see the gears are marked to show TDC for the rear.

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Now on the first gear on the crack (which is ignition pickup I believe) there is not a gap at TDC to allow the gears on the balancer shaft to come off. So the locking bolt needs to be removed and the engine turned enough to bring the gap in this gear up to allow the gears on the balancer shaft to be removed. I photographed the position of this gear on the sensor and marked it with Tipex after advancing it so all the timing could be put back in sync after the timing chain has been changed.

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With that done I lock the engine at this point to be safe. There are actually 2 gears on the balancer shaft and they are preloaded with tension. You need to use circlips pliers to take tension out. You can then removed the first gear.

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Now there isn’t a marking on the second gear so mark it with tipex to be safe and remove

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Next problem is the balancer weight won’t come past the gears. Marked that in position top and bottom and turn it far enough to remove it.

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Ok now you need to remove the 2 Woodruff keys in the shaft so as to remove the chain gear. They tap out with the screw driver and rubber mallet. Clean any bur off them with a small file.

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Now a small gear puller to remove the gear.

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Ok that’s everyting done for the rear cylinder. Time to move onto the front.

Unlock the engine again and turn it anticlockwise through 360 + 70 degrees and it’s at TDC for the front. You can see through the hole from the locking bolt a small indent in the when the bike is at TDC. Look for this if you are unsure. Although it’s not critical as the engine is rebuilt from the rear cylinder and there are marking to show when you are at this.

Follow the steps for rear cylinder to remove the front. Cam chain tensioner, double timing gear, chain guide and then lift cylinder, remove gudgeon pin and slide off cylinder and strip and clean. Front cylinder had more pronaunced honing still visable

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Remove the ignition cover. You’ll need to remove the fly wheel. I didn’t have a fly wheel puller so used a 20mm thread bolt and an impact gun and it comes straight off. Then remove the freewheel behind it

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Next remove the idler gear on the end of the balancer shaft.

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You can use a rubber mallet to tap the balancer shaft through from the clutch side. Once it’s out you can swap the timing chains and place it back in.

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Back on with the idle gear and freewheel gear and finally the flywheel. This needs to be torqued up to 150nm.

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Ok that’s the ignition side complete. You need to unlock the engine and turn it anticlockwise to rear TDC and past it to get timing back to where you had it when gears were removed. You can see its there by lining up the ignition sensor and gear that was photographed when the engine was advanced to let the gears come off.

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Lock the engine again and fit the new timing chain and its gear. Tap the woodruff pins back in.

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Refit the balancer weight. Its keyed so you can’t get it wrong. Tap in with a socket

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Then the first of the 2 gears, again this is keyed to the Woodruff key so you can’t go wrong.

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Next is the outer gear. Its important you line this up proberly with the first geat or the weight will be in the wrong place and engine will be unblanced. Use the tipex marks to get the correct position.

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Getting the spring loaded clip back in position is a bitch. You need to line it up with the outer gear and then put it in place. Add the washers in the correct order and then the nut with 243 and tighten to the point you can still just move the clip with circlip pliers. I found it needed the help of a screw driver pushing it into correct position to get it home. Tighten nut to 120nm.

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You can now safetly unlock the engine and turn it back a few degrees to TDC on the gears. Lock it off again and its time to rebuild the rear cylinder. You can refit the starter motor at this point as well.

Rebuilding the rear is simply a reverse of the strip. Refit the studs to bolt the cylinder/head down and the dowl pins. Bolt the head back to the cylinder with a new gasket. I then used the wellseal on the engine casing and placed gasket in place. Lower the cylinder down,feed the cam chain lower guide into the channel and feed the conrod into the piston. Slide in the gudgeon pin. Now comes the bitch. Getting the retaining pin or as I named it the Jesus fooking Christ! pin as it flew across the workshop for the 3rd time. I warn you it’s a biatch! Keep those rags in the engine casing or you can bet the thing will fly in there and then you are going to have to try and retrieve it. When it is finally in place lower the head all the way down. Refit the main nuts and tighten in 2 stages. First to 20nm and then to 38. I went to 45 as those bitches ain’t leaking again!! I then poured 1ltr of oil down the timing chain channel. Its around what was lost when I removed the sump plug. Refit the upper chain guide. Next comes the double timing gear and its needle bearing bolt to 30nm. Cam chain adjuster next and tighten to 20nm. Finally the cams go back in in the correct postions . Bolt down the bridge. Tighten larger bolts and smaller to 10nm and then the larger bolts to 18nm. You can fit the cam cover and move on to the front cylinder. Unlock the engine bolt and turn the engine anti clockwise 360 + 70 degrees. Lock it off and fit the cylinder following same procdure for rear.
With that done you can unlock the engine and refit the ignition and clutch side engine covers. If you want to play it safe, before you fit the spark plugs you can turn the engine over by hand to make sure nothing fouls. If you have followed all the steps and taken your time it should be fine. Better to be safe than sorry though. If its all good fit the plugs.

Then its just a matter of fitting everything back on the bike. Fill the coolant system and raise the front of the bike to 40 degrees. Then fire her up! Once the engine hits 4 bars (on 05/06 dash) the thermostat opens and water from rad gets drawn into the engine. Top up until no more bubbles and fit rad cap.

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Now go out and ride and enjoy!.
"They lie about marijuana. Tell you pot-smoking makes you unmotivated. Lie! When you're high, you can do everything you normally do, just as well. You just realise that it's not worth the f*cking effort. There is a difference."
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Re: Timing Chain change time

Postby ozarkhomie » Mon May 06, 2013 12:35 pm

Has anyone ever used teflon buttons to replace the clips for the connecting rod pins? Used them in air cooled vw turbo engines as insurance against a slipped out/broken clip.
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Re: Timing Chain change time

Postby JohnJJr » Mon May 06, 2013 5:03 pm

Damn !!! Looks like KTM made it easy to replace timing chains ...... :shock:

best of luck for a successful outcome -------- why base gaskets leaking anyhow's ??? any idea ?

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Re: Timing Chain change time

Postby Superdan » Mon May 06, 2013 5:11 pm

Nice work Klinky. Is it all back together? Fingers crossed last time you do this.

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Re: Timing Chain change time

Postby Colonel_Klinck » Mon May 06, 2013 5:45 pm

JohnJJr wrote:Damn !!! Looks like KTM made it easy to replace timing chains ...... :shock:

best of luck for a successful outcome -------- why base gaskets leaking anyhow's ??? any idea ?


Because its an engine that was designed as a 950 to win the Dakar and be serviable at road side. Wasn't designed to be thrashed around race tracks and bounced off the redline.

Superdan wrote:Nice work Klinky. Is it all back together? Fingers crossed last time you do this.



Yeah all good dude. She was running fine but being a heavy handed cnut I didnt realise id stripped one of the cam cover bolt seats. The cam cover bolts into the cam bridge which is magnesium. It has inserts in it for the threads so I'm going to have a time sert fitted tomorrow. I noticed as when I had it at 40 degrees for burping coolant system there was oil dropping down front. TBH 10nm is a fair bit for a M6 bolt. Little finger tight from now on. Not the end of the world though and of all the things that could go wrong it's pretty minor. I'll finish the walk through of it all later.
"They lie about marijuana. Tell you pot-smoking makes you unmotivated. Lie! When you're high, you can do everything you normally do, just as well. You just realise that it's not worth the f*cking effort. There is a difference."
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Re: Timing Chain change time

Postby Lowrance » Tue May 07, 2013 2:47 am

JohnJJr wrote:Damn !!! Looks like KTM made it easy to replace timing chains ...... :shock:

best of luck for a successful outcome -------- why base gaskets leaking anyhow's ??? any idea ?


Cylinder studs stretch after a while and allow oil to escape past the base gaskets.

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Re: Timing Chain change time

Postby JohnJJr » Tue May 07, 2013 4:02 am

Colonel_Klinck wrote:
JohnJJr wrote:Damn !!! Looks like KTM made it easy to replace timing chains ...... :shock:

best of luck for a successful outcome -------- why base gaskets leaking anyhow's ??? any idea ?


Because its an engine that was designed as a 950 to win the Dakar and be serviable at road side. Wasn't designed to be thrashed around race tracks and bounced off the redline.

Superdan wrote:Nice work Klinky. Is it all back together? Fingers crossed last time you do this.



Yeah all good dude. She was running fine but being a heavy handed cnut I didnt realise id stripped one of the cam cover bolt seats. The cam cover bolts into the cam bridge which is magnesium. It has inserts in it for the threads so I'm going to have a time sert fitted tomorrow. I noticed as when I had it at 40 degrees for burping coolant system there was oil dropping down front. TBH 10nm is a fair bit for a M6 bolt. Little finger tight from now on. Not the end of the world though and of all the things that could go wrong it's pretty minor. I'll finish the walk through of it all later.


Bravo !!! Would have taken me a week for sure to do that job. Took me 2 days as it was to adjust valves ( radiator removed/repainted , Oil tank removed/repainted.). Valve covers repainted ...

BTW - a few days ago i believe you mentioned to someone to use a wooden dowel or something to place up against different parts of the engine and use the dowel/etc as a stethoscope by placing the loose end up in the ear....... I had forgotten how useful that trick is - my dad used to do that ... Anyway i had to go around different parts of the engine on my bike yesterday doing just that just to hear what's going on ... Really works well.
cheers

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Re: Timing Chain change time

Postby Colonel_Klinck » Tue May 07, 2013 6:10 am

JohnJJr wrote:
Bravo !!! Would have taken me a week for sure to do that job. Took me 2 days as it was to adjust valves ( radiator removed/repainted , Oil tank removed/repainted.). Valve covers repainted ...

BTW - a few days ago i believe you mentioned to someone to use a wooden dowel or something to place up against different parts of the engine and use the dowel/etc as a stethoscope by placing the loose end up in the ear....... I had forgotten how useful that trick is - my dad used to do that ... Anyway i had to go around different parts of the engine on my bike yesterday doing just that just to hear what's going on ... Really works well.
cheers



Cheers dude. I really enjoyed doing it. I was in the workshop by 7am everyday I was having that much fun!

It was a screw driver and it was the m8 who's workshop I was working in that showed me that years ago. I owned an old banger of a car when I was 18 and it was making some horrible sounds. Tracked it down to the be the alternator using that technique.
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Re: Changing base gaskets and timing chains. Walkthrough

Postby tripoddave » Tue May 07, 2013 6:47 am

Truly epic post!
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Re: Changing base gaskets and timing chains. Walkthrough

Postby lawman » Tue May 07, 2013 11:40 am

Nice to see this post and the detail. Thanks for posting Craig, hopefully I'll never need it!

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Re: Changing base gaskets and timing chains. Walkthrough

Postby KTM666 » Tue May 07, 2013 2:43 pm

Great write up...needs to be a sticky

I do not have access to workshop...or..... the time......(or skill sets :oops: ) Excuses over with booked in for repair at Wool Motor Cycles (AKA) Kyle & Bob from Sideways :wink: ....so it will be in great hands
I saw the light...............and it was .....................Orange

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Re: Changing base gaskets and timing chains. Walkthrough

Postby ktmguy » Wed May 08, 2013 12:59 am

Great write up and good job! I never took it appart that far but I'm surprised to see that so much needs done just to do the chains.
Funny it leaks at the base too, the way the cylinder bore goes in the crank case normally means that seals pretty much by itself.
I've seen engines where that fits tight and they only have some sealer there and no gasket and no leaks at all.

How tight is the cylinder bore in the crank case Craig?
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Re: Changing base gaskets and timing chains. Walkthrough

Postby bic_bicknell » Wed May 08, 2013 2:30 am

Nice write up Craig. Certainly good for getting me back to sleep at three in the morning cos the kids all woke me up!
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Re: Changing base gaskets and timing chains. Walkthrough

Postby Colonel_Klinck » Wed May 08, 2013 5:55 am

ktmguy wrote:Great write up and good job! I never took it appart that far but I'm surprised to see that so much needs done just to do the chains.
Funny it leaks at the base too, the way the cylinder bore goes in the crank case normally means that seals pretty much by itself.
I've seen engines where that fits tight and they only have some sealer there and no gasket and no leaks at all.

How tight is the cylinder bore in the crank case Craig?


Yeah its a bit of a ball ache. If you were to follow the repair manual you'd have to take the whole clutch basket out and all those gears which is so not necessary. This is why I did the walkthrough.

The lower bore that sits inside the engine case isn't tight at all. Doesn't maybe show on the pics but there are no wear marks where it touches the engine internal engine cases. If I was a bit tighter it would probably avoid the base gasket issue as the cylinder wouldn't be able to vibrate forward and backwards at high rpm, which I'm sure is what results in the oil leaks. I'm really hoping I've sorted it this time. Time will tell and my next race is on the 18th and if it's going to start weeping that's when it will happen.
"They lie about marijuana. Tell you pot-smoking makes you unmotivated. Lie! When you're high, you can do everything you normally do, just as well. You just realise that it's not worth the f*cking effort. There is a difference."
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Re: Changing base gaskets and timing chains. Walkthrough

Postby Sabre » Thu May 09, 2013 4:34 pm

Nice write up Craig 8) Clear step by step guide, dont think i'll be attempting a strip down that far in my garage without a bike ramp and decent lighting. Good to hear she's back up and running :twisted:
If it's orange it's worth a spin !

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